I went out to Crawford Notch with Guthook and the Mountain Dog to bag a few peaks today. We started up the Avalon Trail and the A-Z Trail to get to Mt Tom at 4051′. There was fresh powder so it was snowshoes all the way. The sky was mostly cloudy but there were occasionally glimpses of a very blue sky. It was warm enough that I was sweating in just my shirt and no hat or gloves on the uphills.

On top of Mt Tom

On top of Mt Tom

Awesome view

Awesome view

Foster had a big ice ball stuck in his paw on the way down Tom, but he managed to lick it out, and then ate it. Take that, ice! I was a little worried he’d be collecting more ice, but he was happy again as soon as the ice was out so we decided to head for the next peak and see how it went.

The Willey Range Trail over to Mt Field had not been hiked on yet so we were breaking trail. The trees seemed so low above us, and we didn’t see any blazes at all, so the snow was definitely very deep. The Mountain Dog got bogged down enough that he actually got behind me and let me pack the trail down for him towards the end, which is very unusual.

The snow was piled up on the trees very heavily. If one was hanging too low, I could usually just smack the snow off with my trekking poles, and then the tree would raise five feet or so and be perfectly easy to walk under.

We reached the summit of Mt Field at 4340′ at the same time as several other people coming up a different trail. There were some gray jays hanging out and some of the other hikers got them to land on their hands by offering food. We left the birds alone and started back down.

The Mountain Dog waiting impatiently

The Mountain Dog waiting impatiently

All the trees covered in heavy snow

All the trees covered in heavy snow

Gray jay on the peak of Mt Field

Gray jay on the peak of Mt Field

Another hiker feeding a gray jay

Another hiker feeding a gray jay

On top of Mt Field

On top of Mt Field

Foster’s paws seemed to be doing okay but I was still a little worried so we decided to head back early, skipping Mt Willey. We took the Avalon Trail down to Mt Avalon, not a 4,000 footer at only 3442′, but it had a great view. The clouds lifted enough to be able to see Webster Cliffs across the Notch.

There was some good glissading on the way back down, usually short sections, but a couple of long ones. Why hike down when you can slide?

View back to Field

View back to Field

On top of Mt  Avalon, Webster Cliffs in background

On top of Mt Avalon, Webster Cliffs in background

Heading back down

Heading back down

I also attempted to hike Mt Chocorua yesterday with Hiker Box, Badass, and Guthook, but had to turn back due to not feeling well. I did get to say goodbye to Hiker Box though, as he leaves in a couple weeks for a hike connecting the Arizona Trail, Grand Enchantment Trail, and Continental Divide Trail, followed by the Te Araroa Trail in New Zealand. Follow him here. And it was nice to meet Badass, yet another lady I will know on the PCT this year. The hikers I already know heading out there are adding up!

Written by Siren

6 Comments

Brockton Smith

Being laid up with my foot. And now laid off due to weather here round Corning, I completly enjoy you posts. Thank you Kristen. Can’t wait to hear your stories at Lamoka this Summer. Hugs Hun.

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Jackie

What amazing pictures, i enjoy everyone! I’m sure. The M dog is very intelegent, after all, you were cutting the trail for him. Jackie

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